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Kentville’s Pettet draws first assignment in international hockey

Posted on December 12, 2016

17 year old Pettet from Kentville will play for Canada at next month’s world under-18 hockey championship.  As reported by the Localxpress.  Read it on their site here.

A knee injury might have derailed her dreams, but now the world is calling Kentville’s Brette Pettet.

The 17-year-old Pettet, a student for the last five years at Shattuck-St. Mary’s prep school in Minnesota, will suit up in Team Canada colours for the world women’s under-18 hockey championship next month in the Czech Republic.

Pettet, a five-foot-three forward, will wrap up at Shattuck, the former home to Cole Harbour’s Sidney Crosby and Stellarton’s Blayre Turnbull among others, before heading to the NCAA’s Wisconsin Badgers next year. Turnbull, now with the national women’s program, also played at Wisconsin.

The world championship runs from Jan. 7-15 in Prerov and Zlin. Pettet will turn 18 on the trip.

Spryfield’s Troy Ryan will be the head coach. He was the head coach for the 2015 Canada Games team with Pettet on the roster.

“This opportunity definitely means a lot to me and I think for every other girl named to the team this year,” said Pettet, who will be home in Nova Scotia for the holidays beginning next week. “I think, for most of us, this is a dream that we’ve had since we started playing hockey. Just to see my name on the list … with all the other girls I look up to is pretty inspiring and a great feeling.”

She’s been part of an ongoing evaluation process. Hockey Canada brought together 50 players in May for a strength and conditioning camp in Hamilton, Ont., and 43 for a camp in August in Calgary.

Pettet hoped she’d be one of the lucky ones to be selected for the worlds, but didn’t count on it.

“Canada is full of talented girl hockey players, so you’ve just got to work your hardest and hope that you’ve left it all on the ice, and hopefully you’ll be named to the team.”

There was a decent chance she might have missed out this time around.

A week before the spring camp, she tore her meniscus and needed surgery. While the other players got to show their skills to the coaching staff, Pettet had to wait until a second camp in Calgary to show she was capable and healthy.

She was able to stick around and play a three-game series against the U.S.

“My first thought when I got injured was that it was awful timing,” she said. “It was the first time I’d been invited to a Hockey Canada event and I couldn’t go. I wasn’t sure how it would impact my future relations with them.

“So I was very nervous and anxious about it at the start, but I quickly came to realize that all I could do was focus on my recovery. The rest wasn’t up to me.”

It was a full 10-week recovery and she had just resumed some training exercises at the start of the second camp.

Pettet grew up playing hockey with boys. Her team at Shattuck is her first female team.

She played two years of peewee AAA, where bodychecking was allowed.

“Going into bantam, my parents brought up the notion that maybe I was too small and I might get hurt if I continued to play with the boys,” she said.

She knew Sidney Crosby and sister Taylor, a goalie, attended Shattuck. So had Turnbull and Dartmouth’s Alexis Crossley.

“Seeing where they are today … it was a dream of mine to follow in their footsteps. Once I had the opportunity to come to Shattuck, it was something I couldn’t turn down.”

She left home in Grade 8 to chase her hockey dreams, but the Annapolis Valley is still close to her heart and she receives plenty of Bluenose support. She singled out Acadia head coach Darren Burns as one of her biggest backers.

“He’s helped me a lot when I’m home, whether it’s helping me find ice or setting me up with trainers. He’s given me some opportunities to succeed when I needed it most. I really appreciate that.”

Canada opens the world championship against Sweden on Jan. 7.

Canada took silver at last year’s tournament in St. Catharines, Ont. The national team won gold in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

“Absolutely, I’m excited and I couldn’t be more privileged or honoured to play on behalf of Canada,” Pettet said. “But I think it also comes with a sense of responsibility and makes you a little nervous just knowing that there are so many girls who would love to be in your position. I think everyone on the team just wants to do their best, and at the end of the day, hope we can bring a gold medal home.”

Pettet was part of a 2016 Team Atlantic at the national women’s under-18 tournament in Saskatchewan, recording two goals and two assists in four games.

A knee injury might have derailed her dreams, but now the world is calling Kentville’s Brette Pettet.

The 17-year-old Pettet, a student for the last five years at Shattuck-St. Mary’s prep school in Minnesota, will suit up in Team Canada colours for the world women’s under-18 hockey championship next month in the Czech Republic.

Pettet, a five-foot-three forward, will wrap up at Shattuck, the former home to Cole Harbour’s Sidney Crosby and Stellarton’s Blayre Turnbull among others, before heading to the NCAA’s Wisconsin Badgers next year. Turnbull, now with the national women’s program, also played at Wisconsin.

The world championship runs from Jan. 7-15 in Prerov and Zlin. Pettet will turn 18 on the trip.

Spryfield’s Troy Ryan will be the head coach. He was the head coach for the 2015 Canada Games team with Pettet on the roster.

“This opportunity definitely means a lot to me and I think for every other girl named to the team this year,” said Pettet, who will be home in Nova Scotia for the holidays beginning next week. “I think, for most of us, this is a dream that we’ve had since we started playing hockey. Just to see my name on the list … with all the other girls I look up to is pretty inspiring and a great feeling.”

She’s been part of an ongoing evaluation process. Hockey Canada brought together 50 players in May for a strength and conditioning camp in Hamilton, Ont., and 43 for a camp in August in Calgary.

Pettet hoped she’d be one of the lucky ones to be selected for the worlds, but didn’t count on it.

“Canada is full of talented girl hockey players, so you’ve just got to work your hardest and hope that you’ve left it all on the ice, and hopefully you’ll be named to the team.”

There was a decent chance she might have missed out this time around.

A week before the spring camp, she tore her meniscus and needed surgery. While the other players got to show their skills to the coaching staff, Pettet had to wait until a second camp in Calgary to show she was capable and healthy.

She was able to stick around and play a three-game series against the U.S.

“My first thought when I got injured was that it was awful timing,” she said. “It was the first time I’d been invited to a Hockey Canada event and I couldn’t go. I wasn’t sure how it would impact my future relations with them.

“So I was very nervous and anxious about it at the start, but I quickly came to realize that all I could do was focus on my recovery. The rest wasn’t up to me.”

It was a full 10-week recovery and she had just resumed some training exercises at the start of the second camp.

Pettet grew up playing hockey with boys. Her team at Shattuck is her first female team.

She played two years of peewee AAA, where bodychecking was allowed.

“Going into bantam, my parents brought up the notion that maybe I was too small and I might get hurt if I continued to play with the boys,” she said.

She knew Sidney Crosby and sister Taylor, a goalie, attended Shattuck. So had Turnbull and Dartmouth’s Alexis Crossley.

“Seeing where they are today … it was a dream of mine to follow in their footsteps. Once I had the opportunity to come to Shattuck, it was something I couldn’t turn down.”

She left home in Grade 8 to chase her hockey dreams, but the Annapolis Valley is still close to her heart and she receives plenty of Bluenose support. She singled out Acadia head coach Darren Burns as one of her biggest backers.

“He’s helped me a lot when I’m home, whether it’s helping me find ice or setting me up with trainers. He’s given me some opportunities to succeed when I needed it most. I really appreciate that.”

Canada opens the world championship against Sweden on Jan. 7.

Canada took silver at last year’s tournament in St. Catharines, Ont. The national team won gold in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2014.

“Absolutely, I’m excited and I couldn’t be more privileged or honoured to play on behalf of Canada,” Pettet said. “But I think it also comes with a sense of responsibility and makes you a little nervous just knowing that there are so many girls who would love to be in your position. I think everyone on the team just wants to do their best, and at the end of the day, hope we can bring a gold medal home.”

Pettet was part of a 2016 Team Atlantic at the national women’s under-18 tournament in Saskatchewan, recording two goals and two assists in four games.